Archive - 2014

Date

July 20th

Peace may never be at hand

    Israelis and Palestinians may someday make peace. But the assumption should be that it won't happen soon -- perhaps not in our lifetimes.

Do-nothing theatrics on immigration

    My son, the skateboarder, has a name for people who dress the part, talk the part, but who don’t really do what dedicated skateboarders do. He calls them “posers.”

    On immigration, U.S. Sen. John Cornyn is a poser. He talks about it – oh, my, yes. But when it comes to doing something about it, he won’t. That’s because posing plays better for the cameras.

No Time To Stop Now

    Yes, women won the vote in 1920 but never let it be said it was given. It was a hard struggle that did not, could not, stop because, as we were to learn, it was only the first step, continuing today. Despite what has been achieved the current political climate makes it quite clear that this is certainly no time to let up on our efforts. There may even be some direction in the idea that, "Well behaved women rarely make history!"

Elizabeth Warren for president?

    It was one of those important-but-dull hearings that don't even get broadcast on C-SPAN 3.

    An obscure subcommittee was taking expert testimony on patient safety Thursday, and only four of its 14 members bothered to show up. Several of the public seats were empty, too.

    But Elizabeth Warren was in her element.

More dads want paid paternity leave

    Marc Carlson, a senior manager at Ernst & Young in Detroit, took two weeks of the company's standard paid parental leave for dads when his daughter, Rebecca, was born last year. Then, when his wife, Diana, went back to work as a physician, Carlson declared himself the primary caregiver and took the maximum four additional weeks of paid leave.

    Carlson, 35, changed diapers, took Rebecca for walks and struggled for what seemed like hours to get the uncooperative baby to drink from a bottle.

Israeli official sees Gaza invasion as 'very high possibility'

    On a day rattled by a fury of air attacks, Israel and Hamas found themselves Wednesday searching for a way forward, with a senior Israeli military official declaring that a ground invasion of Gaza was a "very high possibility."

Helping children is better way to fight inequality

    Malefactors of great wealth get a lot of press these days. The poor, not so much. There might be a connection. Concentrating on the super-rich seems to divert attention from the more serious social injustice at the other end of the income scale. If you're born into a poor family in the United States, you'll find moving up is harder than it would be in many other rich countries. That's a deeply troubling fact, or it would be if more Americans could bring themselves to believe it.

You might belong in the Middle Ages

    Recently, the Pew Research Center reported that people tend to live closer to people who agree with them. We are all moving into enclaves of shared ideology, it turns out.

    Right now, our only option for making certain that our neighbors are on the same wavelength is to hightail it to the outskirts of, say, Cincinnati.

    But once they legalize time travel, that won't be the only question.

Capitalism that works: Lessons from spying on Germany

    As long as U.S. intelligence agencies are hell-bent on spying on Germany, why can't they turn up some truly useful secrets? For instance, how to have an economy that bolsters a nation's power and fosters a vibrant middle class.

Removing Confederate flags is a small but welcome start

    Something extraordinary happened last week at Washington and Lee University in Lexington, Virginia. The president of the private college, where Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee served as president after the Civil War and whose body now lies beneath the Lee Chapel, apologized for the school's past ownership of about 80 slaves and promised to remove Confederate flags on prominent display in the chapel's main chamber.