Archive

July 30th, 2016

The theory of political leadership that Donald Trump shares with Adolf Hitler

    There. He came out and said it. "I alone," Donald Trump averred in his speech Thursday night accepting the Republican nomination for president, can save America, save the world, save you.

    Rarely in modern political memory has a candidate so personalized a candidacy. Certainly, no other U.S. political figure comes to mind who dared make such an exclusive claim on truth and light. A savior complex may have befallen some of them, but who was bold enough to voice it so plainly as Trump?

    That does not mean there is no historical precedent for campaigning -- and ruling -- on a platform of messianic certainty, though. One man who did it was Adolf Hitler.

    I know: Likening any modern politician to Hitler is a dodgy errand. And while people have been making the comparison this year, it's usually unfair and inapt. Hitler was ultimate evil. Trump is no mass murderer; Trump is no Nazi; Trump has launched no wars.

Full text and e-editions are available to premium subscribers only. To subscribe to the digital edition, please visit subscription page. If you are already a subscriber, please login to the site.

We'd be happy to set up login information for a free week of the Liberal Opinion Week website for you. Please email liberal@iowaconnect.com with your request. Thanks for your interest in the Liberal!

The Republican 'lock her up!' chants were disturbing - and inevitable

    Political conventions used to be celebratory affairs. But in Cleveland this week, the most reliable source of good cheer has been Republicans' collective fantasy of putting Hillary Clinton behind bars.

    First there were the ritualized chants of "lock her up." Then, leading Trump surrogate (and former federal prosecutor) Gov. Chris Christie used his podium time to conduct a mock show trial, leading a call-and-response to delighted cries of "guilty!" The next day, a Trump delegate and adviser said that the presumptive Democratic nominee for president - a former secretary of state, senator, and first lady (whom the FBI declined to charge with any crime after a long investigation into her email practices) - "should be put in the firing line and shot for treason." The best Trump's spokeswoman could muster was that "we don't agree with his comments" while reaffirming that "we're incredibly grateful for his support."

Full text and e-editions are available to premium subscribers only. To subscribe to the digital edition, please visit subscription page. If you are already a subscriber, please login to the site.

We'd be happy to set up login information for a free week of the Liberal Opinion Week website for you. Please email liberal@iowaconnect.com with your request. Thanks for your interest in the Liberal!

Michelle Obama's skillful take down of Donald Trump

    There is shade. And then, there are intricately constructed avenues of shade so dense that entire shadow-loving plants germinate, sprout and flourish at triple speed.

    The latter is what Michelle Obama cast in the direction of Donald Trump on Monday night at the Democratic National Convention while reserving a special, at points emotional, type of praise for Hillary Clinton. Trump, an unnamed cartoon-character-like villain was referenced only indirectly as a kind of ego-driven, undisciplined potential president uninterested in both the rigors and goals of public service - a sharp and telling contrast to Clinton, according to Obama's speech.

    The combination was enough make Obama's the first speech of the night during which a mention of Clinton's name did not elicit cross chants and boos from Sanders supporters, according to several people in and around the convention hall.

    It was, to put it frankly, a rather skillful take down of one Donald J. Trump.

Full text and e-editions are available to premium subscribers only. To subscribe to the digital edition, please visit subscription page. If you are already a subscriber, please login to the site.

We'd be happy to set up login information for a free week of the Liberal Opinion Week website for you. Please email liberal@iowaconnect.com with your request. Thanks for your interest in the Liberal!

In fighting Trump, Clinton finds her vision

    Say what you will about Donald Trump's sinister speech at the Republican National Convention, it achieved one of its primary goals: Trump now owns the mantle of "change" in this election.

    Trump confirmed his candidacy not only as a break from the political status quo, but also from U.S. presidential rhetoric and democratic norms as they've evolved over more than two centuries. His speech deliberately exhumed Richard Nixon's darkest impulses while divorcing itself, utterly, from Nixon's intellectual depth and creativity.

    Trump departed not only from politics as usual, but American history and culture as usual, offering himself as a man of destiny, Putinesque or Peronist, and as the singular, heroic, unrebuttable answer -- "I alone" -- to every national question.

    How does Hillary Clinton follow that?

    Just as Cleveland was largely cast as a prosecution -- replete with the creepy, oft-shouted refrain of "Lock her up!" -- the Democratic convention in Philadelphia this week can't help but be something of a defense.

Full text and e-editions are available to premium subscribers only. To subscribe to the digital edition, please visit subscription page. If you are already a subscriber, please login to the site.

We'd be happy to set up login information for a free week of the Liberal Opinion Week website for you. Please email liberal@iowaconnect.com with your request. Thanks for your interest in the Liberal!

July 29th

In a change election, Clinton is the incumbent

    As the Democratic National Convention convenes in Philadelphia, Hillary Clinton faces many widely reported challenges. She is generally not trusted, and the majority of Americans tend to repeat what has now become a cliche invented by President Obama: Clinton just doesn't have that new-car smell. I continue to believe Clinton and Donald Trump are propping each other up. They are both so unpopular that the race for the presidency is staying close, even as one consistently acts erratically and the other seems to have a virtual indictment despite not being actually indicted by the FBI. But in addition to the current macro political environment, Clinton faces three specific challenges that are unique to her and to this era in modern politics.

Full text and e-editions are available to premium subscribers only. To subscribe to the digital edition, please visit subscription page. If you are already a subscriber, please login to the site.

We'd be happy to set up login information for a free week of the Liberal Opinion Week website for you. Please email liberal@iowaconnect.com with your request. Thanks for your interest in the Liberal!

How Trump attacks the media, and why that distorts reality

    Only a few minutes into Donald Trump's acceptance speech Thursday night, he started his familiar attacks on the media:

    "If you want to hear the corporate spin, the carefully crafted lies and the media myths - the Democrats are holding their convention next week. Go there."

    Casting himself as Truth Teller In Chief, he doubled down: "I will tell you the plain facts that have been edited out of your nightly news and your morning newspaper," he said. And this: "Big business, elite media and major donors are lining up behind my opponent because they know she will keep our rigged system in place."

    His words brought roars of approval in the Cleveland arena at the Republican National Convention, and the next morning they brought approving smiles from Mary Sue McCarty, a delegate from Dallas who came to the convention bound to Trump.

Full text and e-editions are available to premium subscribers only. To subscribe to the digital edition, please visit subscription page. If you are already a subscriber, please login to the site.

We'd be happy to set up login information for a free week of the Liberal Opinion Week website for you. Please email liberal@iowaconnect.com with your request. Thanks for your interest in the Liberal!

Hillary's VP choice: A governing partner

    Like most presidential nominees, Hillary Clinton said that, in contemplating her choice of a running mate, she was looking for the most qualified person to take over the presidency if necessary. In picking Sen. Tim Kaine of Virginia, she followed through on that objective.

    No one, of course, can be certain that any chosen vice-presidential candidate will work out that way if destiny so dictates. But Kaine is a former mayor, governor and national party chairman, and he is currently a member of the Senate Foreign Relations and Armed Services committees. He has the broad and varied policy and political background to be a governing partner to Clinton if they are elected in November.

    In Kaine, she has chosen a running mate who follows the pattern of the most effective and serviceable vice presidents over that last 40 years in both parties -- Democrats Walter Mondale, Al Gore and Joe Biden, and Republican Dick Cheney.

    The senior George Bush might arguably also be included, if only because he was subsequently elected president for what was widely touted as a third Ronald Reagan term, although it hardly worked out that way.

Full text and e-editions are available to premium subscribers only. To subscribe to the digital edition, please visit subscription page. If you are already a subscriber, please login to the site.

We'd be happy to set up login information for a free week of the Liberal Opinion Week website for you. Please email liberal@iowaconnect.com with your request. Thanks for your interest in the Liberal!

Trump’s Sham Patriotism

    In his bid for the White House, Donald Trump is playing many roles: law-and-order strongman, sky’s-the-limit builder, dealmaker extraordinaire. But perhaps none is more emphatic than all-American patriot.

    His blood pumps red, white and blue, or so he assures us. In his dreams and decisions, he sees his country above all else. “The most important difference between our plan and that of our opponent,” he told Republicans in Cleveland on Thursday night, “is that our plan will put America first.”

    But this lavishly professed love is a largely semantic affair. It’s fickle. It’s reckless. Under its guise, he’s apparently prepared to jettison values that really do make America great and alliances that really do keep America safer. His patriotism brims with grievances.

    It sulks. Last week he suggested to The Times’ David Sanger and Maggie Haberman that if Russia invaded a NATO ally that wasn’t pulling its weight financially, he might not rise to its defense.

Full text and e-editions are available to premium subscribers only. To subscribe to the digital edition, please visit subscription page. If you are already a subscriber, please login to the site.

We'd be happy to set up login information for a free week of the Liberal Opinion Week website for you. Please email liberal@iowaconnect.com with your request. Thanks for your interest in the Liberal!

Government's privacy rights don't exceed public's

    When it comes to metadata, is turnabout fair play? The New Jersey Supreme Court will decide that question in a fiendishly clever case brought by a libertarian who is demanding the e-mail logs of town officials under the state's Open Public Records Act.

    What makes the case so piquant is that, as Edward Snowden's leaks revealed, the federal government engaged in bulk metadata collection under a questionable interpretation of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act. The authorization relied on for the data collection has since expired, but the legal principle remains. The New Jersey lawsuit in effect asks: if metadata isn't that private, why not give the public access to the government's records of who contacted whom, and when?

Full text and e-editions are available to premium subscribers only. To subscribe to the digital edition, please visit subscription page. If you are already a subscriber, please login to the site.

We'd be happy to set up login information for a free week of the Liberal Opinion Week website for you. Please email liberal@iowaconnect.com with your request. Thanks for your interest in the Liberal!

Blaming Putin won't help Clinton beat Trump

    Hillary Clinton's campaign and its supporters are linking Donald Trump to President Vladimir Putin. This must make the Russian president chuckle. After all, he accused Clinton of inciting protests in Moscow in 2011.

    The Democrats, however, need a reality check. The suggestion of a Russian connection to the Trump campaign is unfounded, at best. And though the hack of the Democratic National Committee's servers, the spoils of which were recently posted on Wikileaks, was probably the work of Russian hackers, no one is denying that this operation exposed an embarrassing tilt of the party in favor of Clinton and against Bernie Sanders.

Full text and e-editions are available to premium subscribers only. To subscribe to the digital edition, please visit subscription page. If you are already a subscriber, please login to the site.

We'd be happy to set up login information for a free week of the Liberal Opinion Week website for you. Please email liberal@iowaconnect.com with your request. Thanks for your interest in the Liberal!