Archive

September 25th, 2016

Donald Trump's black history fail

    Since June 2015, when Donald J. Trump entered the presidential race, there has been a list of long unseen, unheard or imagined things that have, for the electorate, become real.

    But on Tuesday evening in North Carolina, Trump's prevailing sense that oh so much is wrong with America and that he alone can fix it -- all of it -- may have detached him from reality.

    Speaking to a crowd gathered at a Trump rally in Kenansville, N.C., Trump said this:

    "We're going to rebuild our inner cities because our African-American communities are absolutely in the worst shape they've ever been in before. Ever, ever, ever."

    Ever. Got that? Well, those who have cleared the grand bar of eighth-grade history should not.

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Confirmed: Trump campaign is controlling every word of prominent CNN commentator

    An insightful statement has emerged from the Donald Trump campaign. It concerns Corey Lewandowski, the former Trump campaign manager who was apparently fired from his post in June and then quickly signed on as a political commentator for CNN. A couple of weeks later, CNN self-disclosed that their new hire was receiving severance payments from the campaign. Those payments - $20,000 per month to Lewandowski's Green Monster Consulting - continued in August, according to the latest round of campaign finance reports. In response to questions about the setup, the Trump campaign said:

    Corey Lewandowski, who is no longer involved in the campaign, continues to receive monthly severance payments. The campaign will continue to honor its contract with Mr. Lewandowski, which stipulates he will be paid through the end of the year. These payments are in no way compensation for services rendered.

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Yes, it's hard to think about kids with cancer. But please don't look away.

    It's 6:30 a.m. and the sun is starting to peek out over the horizon. I take another gulp of my coffee, and leave the keys with the valet outside the hospital. I check my camera, making sure I have a formatted memory card and fresh batteries in my flash.

    As I grab my bag from the back seat, I can't help but notice the mismatched socks, leftover granola wrappers, and wrinkled school fliers that litter my car. I take a deep breath, thankful that my kids' seats are empty. I'm not at the hospital for them this morning. I'm there for 4-year-old Phoebe.

    About four years ago, I started taking pictures of sick kids. I look for smiles in hospital rooms and look past IV poles in hopes of capturing the fleeting moments of carefree childhoods that exist alongside tragic diagnoses and crippling test results. I look for little hands grasping onto hospital beds as toddlers take their first steps in brightly decorated triage rooms. My heart skips a beat when I see an older sister smile at a younger sibling, knowing that siblings, too, suffer when their loved ones are sick.

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When the county commission's prayer goes too far

    Plenty of local governments open their meetings with a quick, generic prayer from a member of the clergy. But is it different when the lawmakers themselves say "Let us pray" and then supplicate God to open everyone's heart to the message of Jesus Christ? Does that violate the Constitution?

    In a significant defeat for religious liberty, a federal appeals court has upheld a continuous practice of sectarian, public prayer by the members of a North Carolina board of county commissioners. The dissenting judge, the distinguished conservative J. Harvie Wilkinson, said the "seat of government" in the case was made to resemble "a house of worship." The court's majority said it was just following Supreme Court precedent.

    At the start of all the meetings of the Rowan County commissioners, one of the five -- all of whom are Christians and have been as long as anyone can remember -- invites those present stand for the invocation and the Pledge of Allegiance. The commissioners take turns, but each typically opens by saying "Let us pray" or "Please pray with me."

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When it comes to climate change, let's get our priorities straight

    Policy expert Bjorn Lomborg answers The Washington Post's question: How much should the next president be willing to spend on mitigation or retooling for renewable energy?

    The next administration must recognize not only that climate change is a real problem but also that we are not on course to solve it. The next president needs the courage to discard our current feel-good but ineffective solutions. Ending our reliance on the fossil fuels that have powered two centuries of economic growth will require an energy revolution.

    Many policies focus on solving global warming by investing in solar and wind, but over the coming quarter-century, these technologies will contribute only marginally to the solution. Moreover, they are not competitive now and will be mostly inefficient for at least 25 years.

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What is going on here anyway?

    I know, it seems outrageous, But it's getting a lot of attention on some very respectable Web pages - which mainstream media won't mention:

    Donald Trump was not born in Queens,

    He was born in the Philippines,

    In a hotel in downtown Manila.

    Where his hair turned bright vanilla

    Due to vitamin deficiencies.

    His mom and dad were Celanese

    And left him with Franciscan nuns

    At the age of fourteen months.

    Adopted on the 3rd of June

    By a real estate tycoon

    Who took the little boy away

    To a mansion in the U.S.A.

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September 24th

A rising Japanese leader softens her controversial nationalism

    Japan's new defense minister, Tomomi Inada, is pushing her country to become a stronger, more independent actor on the world stage - and trying to make herself prime minister in the process. But as she gets closer to both goals, she's finding that Japan's success is more dependent than ever on deepening cooperation with its neighbors and the United States.

    Inada rose to prominence in Japan as a conservative firebrand who embraced controversial views, including questioning the facts surrounding Japan's wartime atrocities. She once suggested that Japan should get its own nuclear weapons. She is often accused of being a revisionist - a term for those who seek to partly rehabilitate Japan's wartime history. But as was clear to me after an hour-long interview last week during her first trip to Washington in her new role, Inada is coming to terms with the fact that if she wants to lead Japan into the future, she needs to be a globalist first.

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Trump is the Islamic State's dream candidate

    Every time there is a terrorist attack attributed to Muslim extremists anywhere in the world, Donald Trump will rush forward to claim, as he did after an Easter bombing in Pakistan, that he alone can solve the problem of radical Islamic terrorism. His eagerness to score political points has come back to hurt him in the past, as when, following this summer's mass shooting in Orlando, Florida, he sent a tasteless tweet bragging: "Appreciate the congrats for being right on radical Islamic terrorism, I don't want congrats, I want toughness & vigilance. We must be smart!" He must have been deeply disappointed that the Orlando attack, which resulted in the deaths of 49 people, did not give him a boost in the polls. But, he apparently figures, there is still time to make political hay out of the suffering of others.

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The impostor in the red ball cap

    A lot of people have said a lot of things about Donald Trump's deficiencies, but the most succinct may be this: "beyond repair."

    What loose cannon would say such a thing about Trump? Surely it is someone swimming in partisan passion, blinded by bile.

    Ah, but no, the description comes from one of the more dispassionate people imaginable, a Republican to boot: former Defense Secretary Robert Gates.

    True, Gates, confines his assessment to foreign policy. But you can read between the lines in his recent commentary in the Wall Street Journal and deduce that he doesn't think Trump is capable of just about any duty the presidency requires.

    Gates calls Trump "stubbornly uninformed about the world and how to lead our country and government."

    That's not all. Gates calls Trump "temperamentally unsuited to lead our men and women in uniform. He is unqualified and unfit to be commander-in-chief."

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The bipartisan path to tackling climate change

    Policy expert Heather Zichal answers The Washington Post's question: How much should the next president be willing to spend on mitigation or retooling for renewable energy?

    The disconnect between the reality of climate change and Donald Trump's phony dismissal of the issue couldn't be more frustrating to a country in need of solutions, not slogans. Hillary Clinton has promised to protect critical ongoing policies from the current administration. But unless there are new majorities in Congress, if elected she will face the same opposition and intractability on climate policy that President Barack Obama faced.

    The good news is that beneath all the noise and fury, there's actually a clear path ahead to tackling climate change with solutions that are bold and potentially bipartisan. The next administration should seize the opportunity to build a historic partnership between business and government - an opportunity to prove once and for all that good climate policy creates good jobs.

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