Archive

September 28th, 2016

Two types of gun laws: one for blacks and one for whites

    If you are a black man in America, exercising your constitutional right to keep and bear arms can be fatal. You might think the National Rifle Association and its amen chorus would be outraged, but apparently they believe Second Amendment rights are for whites only.

    In reaching that conclusion I am accepting, for the sake of argument, the account given by the Charlotte, North Carolina, police of how they came to fatally shoot Keith Lamont Scott on Tuesday. Scott's killing prompted two nights of violent protests that led Gov. Pat McCrory to declare a state of emergency. On Friday, police in Tulsa, Oklahoma, shot and killed Terence Crutcher -- an unarmed black man -- and the two incidents gave tragic new impetus to the Black Lives Matter movement.

    Scott's relatives claim he was unarmed as well. But let's assume that police are telling the truth and he had a handgun. What reason was there for officers to confront him?

    North Carolina, after all, is an open-carry state. A citizen has the right to walk around armed if he or she chooses to do so. The mere fact that someone has a firearm is no reason for police to take action.

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Trump politics of nostalgia are here to stay

    A hankering for a past in which white supremacy and overt sexism were accepted features of daily life has made Donald Trump the most toxic presidential candidate since George Wallace. But the politics of nostalgia, which he embodies and advances, isn't a new package; Trump has simply wrapped it in barbed wire. And even if his campaign ends up short of the White House, nostalgia could still have a long political run.

    The most profound demographic change in America is surely the rapid progression, fueled by immigration, to a nonwhite majority sometime near the middle of this century. That single fact explains much of U.S. politics right now, as Republicans seek to restrict (nonwhite) immigration and make it more difficult (for nonwhites) to vote while their nominee for president makes blatantly racial appeals for votes.

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The Fed's mission is to escape Jupiter

    Over the past couple decades, the Bank of Japan has tried time and again to get interest rates up from zero, only to discover that the zero bound has a peculiarly strong gravitational pull. Although I hope the new measures it announced this week will help, its past experience holds an important lesson for central banks everywhere.

    When interest rates are already near zero, everyone knows that the central bank can't do a lot more to fight adverse shocks. The sense of vulnerability makes any fear of a downturn more likely to become self-fulfilling, as people and businesses cut back on spending. With this constant drag of downside risk, escaping the zero lower bound is like trying to leave Jupiter instead of Earth: The economic rocket has to go a lot faster.

    The metaphor is relevant for the U.S. Federal Reserve. True, the Fed lifted off from its self-imposed quarter-percentage-point lower bound last December. But that's nothing more than igniting the rocket. It must pass through many phases before the launch can be called successful.

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The difference between the Bushes and Trump

    It's hard to be a Bush these days. Liberals still condemn the most recent President Bush for "lying us into war" in Iraq. Even if you credit George W. Bush with benign intentions, his record is undeniably grim. In foreign policy, fiscal policy and much else -- including its catastrophic inattention to the aims and capabilities of Osama bin Laden and to the desperate pleas of a drowning city -- his administration was mostly a disaster.

    Jeb Bush, meanwhile, is easily mocked. He raised (and his super-PAC spent) an enormous sum in pursuit of the 2016 Republican presidential nomination. The famed "Bush family network" was activated. Yet the candidate was flat-footed and outmatched in debate against an opponent who proved spectacularly ignorant of public issues and whose most sophisticated techniques amounted to playground taunts. Bush's remarkable fundraising and unquestioned expertise got him nowhere.

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No, racism did not start with President Obama

    Days before the opening of the National Museum of African American History and Culture near the Washington Monument, a couple of bizarre political developments illustrated why we Americans need it.

    And I do mean all Americans. "Even if you think this isn't your story," as the museum's director Lonnie G. Bunch III recently told the Washington Post, "it is."

    That's a reasonable response to the cynical wags and trolls who pepper Internet comment threads with sarcastic objections like, "I thought segregation was over" and "When are we going to have a museum for white people?"

    We've got 'em, pal. But having visited museums of various sorts across this great land of ours, I am happy to report that the contributions made by Americans of color to our national narrative are increasingly included. Diversity is in. Conscientious curators like Bunch, former head of the Chicago Historical Society, have made a difference.

    Yet too many of us Americans still harbor woefully incomplete views of life on the other side of our racial divide.

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Government lawyers don't understand the Internet. That's a problem.

    Last year, the FBI nearly destroyed the life of an innocent physicist. In May 2015, agents arrested Xi Xiaoxing, the chairman of Temple University's physics department, and charged that he was sneaking Chinese scientists details about a piece of restricted research equipment known as a "pocket heater." An illustrious career seemed suddenly to implode. A few months later, though, the Justice Department dropped all the charges and made an embarrassing admission: It hadn't actually understood Xi's work. After defense experts examined his supposed "leaks," they pointed out that what he'd shared with Chinese colleagues wasn't a restricted engineering design but in fact a schematic for an altogether different type of device. The case helped lead earlier this year to new Justice Department restrictions that took power away from prosecutors in the field and centralized certain investigations in Washington, where they could receive more oversight from a specially trained team of lawyers.

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Five myths about the Middle Ages

    Most Americans get their ideas about the Middle Ages from popular culture, like "Game of Thrones," or from the inevitable rigmarole after a politician refers to "a crusade." In other words, it's all dragons, dastardly politics and religion-inspired violence. Yet, the European Middle Ages - a period spanning more than 1,000 years - was much richer (and weirder) than even some of the best fiction or political spin.

 

Myth No. 1

    Christianity and Islam were constantly in conflict then.

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Companies that discriminate fail (eventually)

    "The corporate world is a boys' club, and it'll always be a boys' club," said a banker who struck up a conversation with me a few years ago in a coffee shop near the university where I once taught. "Male managers are always going to hire men over women, because they feel more comfortable around men."

    "Aren't there some managers who just hire whoever's best for the job?," I asked.

    "Yeah, there are some," he said. "I don't know what's going on with those guys."

    Gary Becker might have had an idea of what was going on. For decades in the mid-20th century, the future Nobel-winning economist wrote about the economics of discrimination. His theory was, in a nutshell, that the people who make hiring decisions at companies are bigoted -- they'd rather work with people of their own race or gender. Essentially, this is the same explanation that the banker gave me in the coffee shop. According to Becker, bigoted employers will pay lower salaries to the people they don't like, resulting in gender and racial wage gaps.

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Clinton's stop-Trump pitch to millennials

    Democrats, fearful that third-party presidential candidates could attract enough millennials to cost Hillary Clinton key states are stepping up efforts to woo young voters with one message: Stop Trump.

    Gary Johnson, the Libertarian candidate, and Jill Stein, the left-wing Green Party aspirant, are attracting much of their support from younger voters. Some recent polls show them attracting a total of over 10 percent of the vote nationally and doing much better than that with millennials.

    "There are lots of potential Clinton voters who could be lost to these third-party candidates," acknowledges Geoff Garin, the pollster for Priorities USA, the Clinton Super PAC. "We are making a first-class effort to reach them through digital media" and saying "that their vote could mean Donald Trump is president."

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September 27th

Robert Downey Jr. honors the American Way

    Let's talk celebrities and politics. Joss Whedon (creator of the "Buffy the Vampire Slayer" TV show and director of the two blockbuster "Avengers" movies) has formed a pro-Clinton PAC with $1 million of his own money and is producing a series of videos with big Hollywood celebrities. The first one urges voters to register to vote and features movie and TV stars including Avengers Robert Downey Jr., Scarlett Johansson and Mark Ruffalo.

    Meanwhile, Donald Trump campaigned Tuesday with boxing promoter Don King and former college basketball coach Bobby Knight, while many are traveling to Ohio on behalf of Hillary Clinton.

    No, voters aren't going to base their vote choice on what some actor or sports hero tells them to do. The celebrities doing these things, whatever their intentions, are probably doing more to promote themselves than to promote their candidate. At best, the direct effects are really small.

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