Archive

March 15th, 2016

Donald Trump's Gettysburg Infomercial

    The concept of Donald Trump delivering famous speeches has been tried before, but when it was tried before, he had not gotten up in front of the American people after winning Michigan and Mississippi on Semi-Super Tuesday and delivered an hour-long infomercial for Trump Water, Trump Wine, Trump Steaks and Trump Magazine. He even praised Trump University and Trump Airlines. Meanwhile Hillary Clinton started her speech and ended it and we never cut away once.

    Trump said, in his speech, that he was "more presidential than anybody ever except the great Abe Lincoln." But after seeing a transcript of Trump's Gettysburg Address, I am not sure he needed to stop there.

    Hello America. Hello, Gettysburg!

    I love Pennsylvania. I love it here! Look at this place. How can you not?

    Forty, 50, maybe 60 years ago, some really brilliant, remarkable guys, they got together and said, hey, let's build something. Something great, where people can be equal. And now look. Look what we have. It's wonderful, isn't it?

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Why it's all right that a parent and I view this history book differently

    My most important moment in school, at least in relation to what I do for a living, was when my high school U.S. history teacher, Al Ladendorff, encouraged our class to criticize the textbook.

    I had never heard a teacher say that before. Could I really do it? This led to a life of gleefully pointing out flaws in books, newspapers and television and to happy employment as a Washington Post reporter and columnist.

    Arlington parent Hans Bader, a lawyer who knows what fun it is to challenge authority, is trying to encourage that same kind of critical thinking in his third-grade daughter, and in the rest of us. In a post on the Liberty Unyielding website - "Sugar-coated lies? My daughter's politically correct history textbook" - he decries what he sees as big errors and false analyses in his daughter's widely used history textbook, "Our World Far & Wide," by Joy Masoff.

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Can a moderate left beat a radical right?

    Obama Derangement Syndrome is striking Republicans once again.

    To avoid having to answer for the rise of Donald Trump, they want to hold the man in the White House responsible for the emergence of a demagogic showman who has been the loudest voice challenging the legal right of the winner of two elections to be there.

    Obama picked his words carefully but with some quiet glee when he was asked about this at a joint news conference with Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau on Thursday. "I have been blamed by Republicans for a lot of things," Obama said, "but being blamed for their primaries and who they're selecting for their party is" -- here he paused, enjoying the moment -- "novel."

    On the contrary, Obama insisted, it was Republicans who had created "an environment where somebody like a Donald Trump can thrive" and allowed "the circus we've been seeing to transpire." He urged his opponents to "do some introspection."

    That would be nice, wouldn't it?

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Donald Trump's thuggery

    It's always a good day in middle school when the seventh-graders make it out of the cafeteria without a lunchtime food fight. So we should, I suppose, pause to appreciate the restraint and substance of the latest GOP presidential debate.

    The candidates, most notably mashed-potato-flinger-in-chief Donald Trump, managed to make it through the evening without resort to belittling invective ("little Marco," "lying Ted") or juvenile puffery ("He referred to my hands, if they are small, something else must be small. I guarantee you there is no problem. I guarantee.")

    Sigh of relief, and credit to CNN moderator Jake Tapper and his colleagues for substantive questions that did not prod the candidates to taunt one another.

    "So far I cannot believe how civil it's been up here," Trump observed at one point in the evening, as if he has not been the chief engine of 2016 campaign incivility.

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March 14th

What Clinton's Wall Street speeches tell us

    Hillary Clinton has sometimes been cast as her husband's opposite. He's a natural; she's calculating. He's a bubbly roue; she's a Methodist scold. He's a slapdash genius; she's a buttoned-down know-it-all. He's indiscriminate and omnivorous; she's discerning and restrained.

    I've never found this twin portrait entirely convincing. Hillary Clinton didn't traipse through the ice of New Hampshire in the winter of 1992 answering embarrassing questions about her marriage because she insists on a tidy, well-ordered life. She did so because she shared her husband's soaring ambition. Maybe not every last morsel of it, yet surely enough to endure more than many spouses would.

    And, of course, Clinton proved her personal ambition later, running for Senate and then for president. Twice.

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At last, the Republicans sober up

    After months of flirting with the political suicide of the Republican Party in a series of juvenile, irrelevant and vulgar debates, the surviving GOP candidates went a long way Thursday night in Miami to redeem its good name.

    For two hours, Donald Trump, Sens. Ted Cruz and Marco Rubio and Ohio Gov. John Kasich put aside the previous personal abuse and vilification and engaged in the most substantive debate of the election season. Their collective behavior hinted at possible unanticipated unity by the end of the campaign.

    Rather than intensifying the focus on a stop-Trump effort, the night's narrative actually fed into the celebrity businessman's reputation as a successful deal-maker. He managed during the debate to score rhetorical points on foreign trade policy, though he is widely criticized as lacking experience as well as temperament in that field.

    Absent was much of Trump's familiar bombast and incivility that had made him a target of the others. Instead, he said his negotiating talents and record could benefit the U.S. in deals with China, Mexico and other trading partners.

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An issue that links Sanders and Trump: Trade

    Pollsters had a heap of explaining to do after Sen. Bernie Sanders defeated former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton in Michigan's Democratic primary, beating odds that pollsters had put at 99-to-one.

    Polls had Clinton leading Sanders by anywhere from 5 percent to 37 percent in the final week. He won by 50 percent to 48 percent.

    Poll aggregator Nate Silver's site FiveThirtyEight.com said, "By most measures, it's the biggest polling miss in a primary in modern political history."

    What went wrong? The possibilities tell us a lot about the unique nature of this presidential campaign cycle.

    They include an underestimation of youth turnout, a failure to call enough cellphones as well as landlines, an underestimation of how many independents would vote and a failure to poll after Sunday, missing the impact of the Clinton-Sanders debate in Flint.

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Only the voters can stop Trump now

    We the people are going to have to save ourselves from Donald Trump, because politicians don't seem up to the task.

    For the big-haired billionaire it was another week, another romp. In winning three of the four states up for grabs Tuesday, Trump demonstrated once again the weaknesses of his rivals. Ted Cruz, whose core support is among staunch conservatives and evangelical Christians, should have won Mississippi. John Kasich, the sitting governor of Ohio, should have won next-door Michigan. And Marco Rubio ... well, he should have competed somewhere.

    Cruz did manage to win Idaho, somewhat bolstering his claim to be the only plausible anti-Trump candidate left in the field. But Trump has now won primaries in the Northeast, the South, the West and the Midwest. Exit polling showed he had strength among both conservative and moderate voters. If he were not so dangerously unsuitable for the presidency, at this point he'd be called the presumptive Republican nominee.

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Marco Rubio's Worst Week in Washington

    There were 147 delegates at stake in the four states -- Michigan, Mississippi, Hawaii and Idaho -- that cast votes in the Republican presidential race on Tuesday. Marco Rubio won one. No, not one state. One delegate or, put another way, .6 percent of all of the available delegates.

    Not good. Especially considering that Rubio was hoping this week would position him as a real contender to knock off Donald Trump in Florida's winner-take-all primary on March 15. Now Rubio is looking to his home state's vote next Tuesday less as a chance to position himself for the race to come against Trump then as a sort of swan song for his presidential campaign.

    And, unfortunately for Rubio, polling suggests that he's an underdog in the state that launched his political career.

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How Trump could attack Clinton

    Donald Trump's lips were moving again Tuesday night - and you know what that means. For what seemed like forever, but was really about an hour, the Republican front-runner treated America to another primary-night victory speech that was self-absorbed, belligerent and, well, sporadically factual.

    Among his more obvious whoppers was this boast: "If I get to go against Hillary, polls are showing that I beat her. And some of the polls have me beating her very easily." No: Only two reputable national polls this year, one taken for USA Today and one for Fox News, have shown Trump leading Clinton, both times within the margin of error. She's up by more than six points in the RealClearPolitics average.

    Still, those numbers should be cold comfort to Democrats eyeing a matchup between Clinton and Trump, and not simply because they don't capture what people would think when confronted with an actual choice between the two, rather than a hypothetical one.

    The real imponderable is what would happen if Trump trained his verbal guns on the former secretary of state, and her alone, and fired them like this:

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