Archive

Date

November 20th, 2014

Wall Street Takes Over More Statehouses

    No runoff will be needed to declare one unambiguous winner in this month's gubernatorial elections: the financial services industry. From Illinois to Massachusetts, voters effectively placed more than $100 billion worth of public pension investments under the control of executives-turned-politicians whose firms profit by managing state pension money.

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Some tips for the least experienced Senate since 1989

    Well, the dust from the election has cleared (it was metaphorical dust, so clearing it did not take long) and the incoming Senate will be the least experienced since 1989. I'm sure the senators-elect are full of questions and concerns right now. But don't fear, incoming senators reading this now. I've got answers to all of your questions. Relax and keep reading.

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The Fable of Rand Paul

    "The most interesting man in politics" is what Politico Magazine crowned Rand Paul in September, when it placed him at the top of a list of 50 people to keep an eye on. And Time magazine used those exact six words, in that exact order, next to a photograph of Paul on its cover last month.

    The adjective bears notice. Interesting. Not powerful. Not popular. Not even influential.

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When Whites Just Don't Get It, Part 4

    When I write about racial inequality in America, one common response from whites is eye-rolling and an emphatic: It's time to move on.

    "As whites, are we doomed to an eternity of apology?" Neil tweeted at me. "When does individual responsibility kick in?"

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Who Are We?

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Autism and solitary

    Reginald Latson's path to solitary confinement began four years ago as he waited for the public library to open in Stafford County, Va.

     Latson, known as Neli, has an IQ of 69 and is autistic. Teachers and therapists describe him as generally sweet and eager to please.

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Lincoln's vice-presidential switch changed history

    The other day I found myself at the famous Abraham Lincoln Bookshop here, talking about my latest effort, a history on the evolution of the American vice presidency. The visit brought to mind a little-discussed Lincoln story in the book that I will convey here in necessarily abbreviated form.

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Obama and the other electorate

    House Speaker John Boehner has said that President Obama would "poison the well" for legislative action on immigration reform by unilaterally issuing executive orders. But how can you poison a well that has already been filled with partisan cyanide?

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Obama's new attitude: Don't back down

    With only two years left in his final term -- and after a stinging rebuke to his party in the midterm elections, the president is showing a new attitude: No more Mr. Nice Guy.

    First he threw down a challenge on the immigration issue. After years of setbacks and delays, Obama boldly vowed to take executive action to protect as many as 6 million undocumented immigrants from fear of deportation.

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When Government Succeeds

    The great American Ebola freakout of 2014 seems to be over. The disease is still ravaging Africa, and as with any epidemic, there's always a risk of a renewed outbreak. But there haven't been any new U.S. cases for a while, and popular anxiety is fading fast.

    Before we move on, however, let's try to learn something from the panic.

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