Archive

October 5th, 2016

A Trump victory may lead to reconstruction of the racist past

    How about we hold off on dancing in the end zone in celebration of the new National Museum of African American History and Culture? And let's quit wasting time in pursuit of black celebrityhood. What about the danger staring us in the face?

    The prospect of a Donald Trump White House presents African-Americans with the most consequential presidential election since the 1876 race between Republican Rutherford B. Hayes and Democrat Samuel J. Tilden. That 19th-century contest ultimately derailed efforts to extend the full rights and privileges of citizenship to freed African-Americans. Unless folks of color get off our duffs, history may well repeat itself.

    To recall, the 1876 election wound up in an electoral-college dispute over ballot returns from three Southern states under Reconstruction control. To break the stalemate, Republican surrogates of Hayes met with a delegation of Southern Democrats to hammer out a deal: The Southerners would not stand in the way of a Hayes victory if Hayes agreed to withdraw all federal troops from the South, thus leaving former slaves unprotected.

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How Could Anyone Vote for Trump?

    That first debate seems to have helped Hillary Clinton move ahead of Donald Trump in the polls. However, I know that many of you are asking yourselves: Why is this even a question?

    Why isn’t she leading 3-to-1? This is not a normal race between a Democrat and a Republican. One of the candidates has made it clear that he has no attention span or self-control. World security experts in both parties are terrified by the idea of a Trump presidency. He’s screwed small contractors in his business dealings and bought dumb presents for himself with money from his charitable foundation — a charitable foundation, by the way, that appears to have been managed by a team of gerbils. Also, he keeps changing his positions on critical issues and has paid settlements to people alleging he discriminated against them on the basis of race or not being attractive enough.

    And you know that’s just the beginning.

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Trump's last tweet?

           Donald J. Trump has performed a genuine service to our nation. He has now driven home, in a way no apologist, enabler or timid analyst can plausibly deny, that he is far too nasty, immature and frighteningly undisciplined to be president.

     And thanks to Hillary Clinton for the assist: By using the first debate to bring up the case of a Miss Universe who, Trump decided, had put on too much weight, the Democratic nominee unleashed the ugly inner Donald -- the man whom the candidate and his handlers have been trying to hide.

     This should be a wakeup call to political analysts who have gone out of their way since Trump first announced his candidacy to pretend that he was the ingenious creator of a political special sauce who deserved our respect for "speaking his mind." No, Trump all along has been a clinically self-involved con man who never took the issues, the presidency or the future of our country seriously. Can there be any doubt that his campaign is a branding exercise gone, quite literally, mad?

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How Donald Trump gets stop-and-frisk wrong

    As with many topics, Donald Trump doesn't know much about the policing policy widely known as "stop and frisk," but that doesn't deter him one bit from Trump-splaining it to us with unbridled self-confidence.

    The policy, which involves warrantless stops of people who are suspected of criminal activity to search them for weapons, became a highlight in Republican Trump's first debate with his Democratic opponent, Hillary Clinton.

    As his lack of preparation quickly became apparent, the reality-TV star tried to make up for it with a flurry of exciting half-truths and overgeneralizations. He called for Chicago in particular to begin using "stop-and-frisk" tactics to put the brakes on what he has been calling a "crime wave."

    He apparently didn't know that Chicago, like his native New York, has not abandoned stop-and-frisk. The city only has tried to make it less racially and ethnically discriminatory, a policy with which Trump has not shown himself to be very impressed.

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Do we want a middle-schooler in the Oval Office?

    Perhaps the best way to understand Donald Trump is as a case of arrested development.

    In terms of personality and worldview, Trump is stuck in middle school. Early middle school.

     And that's being charitable.

    Part of growing up is developing self-control. Trump never has. Listen to him in the presidential debate, interjecting compulsively, and flash back to seventh grade and the boy in the back of the class who kept interrupting the teacher with wisecracks. It was amusing, the first time or two. Then it became annoying.

    We grew so inured to Trump's antics during the primary campaign that there is a risk of forgetting how great a departure his mugging for the camera and interrupting opponents was from the rather staid norm, especially during general election debates. Trump interrupted Hillary Clinton and moderator Lester Holt a whopping 55 times. "Not," Trump said. "Wrong." "Facts." "Take a look at mine."

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Womanhood is an election issue -- and that's bad news for Trump

    It is hopelessly retro, but perhaps unsurprising, that womanhood has become a prominent issue in the presidential race. This has to be bad for Donald Trump, a hall-of-shame sexist -- and good for Hillary Clinton, an actual woman.

    It was political idiocy for Trump to fall into Clinton's artfully laid trap at the debate Monday night when she mentioned how he treated the woman who won his Miss Universe pageant in 1996: "He called this woman 'Miss Piggy.' Then he called her 'Miss Housekeeping,' because she was Latina. Donald, she has a name."

    Clinton was referring to Alicia Machado, whom Trump threatened with taking away her title after she gained a few pounds. Trump seemed flustered and could only respond with a complete non sequitur -- a defense of the many ugly things he has said about comedian Rosie O'Donnell, maintaining that "I think everybody would agree that she deserves it and nobody feels sorry for her."

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Secret of John Kerry's success is irrational optimism

    If you've ever wondered how Secretary of State John Kerry's understands diplomacy, the waiting is over. On Thursday, at the Aspen Institute's Washington Ideas Forum, Steve Clemons of the Atlantic pried it out of America's top diplomat: What exactly is the "John Kerry secret sauce?"

    There are interests and values, Kerry told the audience. "You may have tension with the values because of the level of the interest, or the values may be -- I mean, the Holocaust or Rwanda -- which is also relevant to the debate about Syria, by the way, the killings and the torture and the barrel bombs and the gas."

    But then we got that secret sauce. After you figure out those values and interests, "you have to figure out whether you can find in the adversaries a meeting of the minds on any of the interests and/or values," he said. "And that mixes differently with different people at different times."

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North Carolina's governor sidles up to Trump

    Immediately after the Sept. 26 presidential debate, Hillary Clinton headed to North Carolina to take a bow. It's easy to see why. The lead in the presidential race has seesawed for months and Donald Trump has been ahead more often than not.

    In most swing states, candidates fear that Trump will be a drag on their campaigns. Witness the speed with which Republican senators up for re-election such as John McCain and Kelly Ayotte fled when asked whether they endorse their party's nominee.

    But in North Carolina, Pat McCrory, the incumbent Republican governor, is hoping Trump will give him a lift. McCrory has run as much as nine points behind his Democratic competitor, former state legislator and now the attorney general, Roy Cooper, who is so popular he ran unopposed in 2012.

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Little good has come from the EB-5 program

    Only 19 percent of Americans trust the federal government to do what's right most of the time, according to the Pew Research Center. And it's hard to blame them, given that our Congress has just extended a 25-year-old visas-for-investment immigration scheme that has accomplished essentially nothing except to foster corruption, risk national security - and subsidize real estate developers.

    The EB-5 program reserves up to 10,000 permanent residency slots each year for foreign nationals who invest in the United States. Congress enacted it in 1990 on the superficially plausible theory that trading green cards for capital would boost the economy, as a similar plan in Canada had reportedly done.

    Before 2008, however, EB-5 produced more than 1,000 investor immigrants per year only once, due to competition from Canada, bureaucratic hassles and a lack of business opportunities fitting the program's minimum requirements - $1 million invested and 10 jobs created. When admissions did go above 1,000, in 1997, the program was temporarily suspended amid concerns that fraud caused the spike.

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Is Donald Trump a one-trick pony?

    Donald Trump's strategists, shaken by his ineffective defensive posture against Hillary Clinton's deft verbal assaults in their first debate, now face an improbable task: somehow remaking his very core.

    That would require turning a candidate whose natural political weapon is an arsenal of personal abuse and factual distortions and lies into a credible political figure able to convince the nation's electorate that he can be trusted running the country.

    The first debate showed Trump to be an undisciplined, rigid and generally uninformed charlatan, driven to project and protect his self-image as an all-purpose problem-solver on a grand scale.

    Rather than again letting Donald be Donald -- which in the first debate often left him looking uncertain and snappish, compared a cool and collected Hillary -- his strategists must convince him to correct course.

    But persuading Trump to ignore the bait tossed out by Clinton might be beyond any political adviser's talents, given his supreme self-confidence and resistance to advice.

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